Greek Bruschetta

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If you love Italian bruschetta, you will absolutely love this Greek Bruschetta! This is the best appetizer or light lunch in the world. My mom has been making me this recipe ever since I can remember and it’s my favorite Greek dish. As many of you know we lived in Crete for many years, so my recipes directly influenced by the island.

Greek Bruschetta

What are Rusks?

If you don’t know what rusk is, you are missing out on this crispy goodness. Rusks are double baked bread and very similar to melba toast. In Italy they are called “Frese or Friselle,” in Greece, “Paximadi” and in Bulgaria we call it “Suxar.” In Turkish they are known as “Peksimet” and in America I have been told they go by name of “Rusks” or “Melba Toast.” Also please don’t confuse cake rusks with regular rusks as cake rusks are sweet and not ideal for this recipe. You can use any double-baked bread alternative as they carry it in every grocery store.

Why You’ll Love Greek Bruschetta

It is a Cretan meze consisting of a slice of soaked dried bread or rusk topped with tomatoes. We also love crumbled feta or mizithra cheese, and flavored with herbs such as dried oregano. For a salty component, try adding olives to elevate the dish.

How to Prepare Greek Bruschetta

💦 Wash and dry the tomato, then cut off a bit of the end with a knife.

🍅 Grate the tomato using the largest side of a handheld grater over a bowl, discarding the skin.

🧂 Add salt, dry oregano, and olive oil to the grated tomatoes and mix well.

🍞 Spread the tomato mixture onto rusks or another double-baked bread alternative.

🧀 Crumble feta cheese on top, allow the mixture to soften the bread for a few minutes, and then enjoy!

Nonna’s Tip 🍅

If you don’t want to use Rusks you are more than welcome to toast your own baguette slices on a grill pan just like you would for bruschetta and use that instead.

Greek Bruschetta

Variations and Substitutions for Greek Bruschetta

Feel free to mix and match these variations to create your favorite version of this Greek Bruschetta and to align with your taste preferences and dietary needs!

  1. Consider adding extra toppings such as sliced olives, 🥒 diced cucumbers, red onions, or capers.
  2. Instead of or in addition to dry oregano, you can experiment with fresh 🌿 herbs like basil, parsley, or thyme.
  3. Instead of rusks, you can use 🥖 toasted baguette slices, pita bread, or any crusty bread of your choice.
  4. If you’re not a fan of feta cheese, you can substitute it with other 🧀 cheeses such as goat cheese, mozzarella, or grated Parmesan.
  5. For a dairy-free or vegan version, you can omit the cheese or use a dairy-free alternative like vegan feta.

Similar Recipes

Best Served With

  • Grilled meats such as Chicken Souvlaki Skewers, lamb kebabs, or grilled fish
  • A tapas-style spread, along with other appetizers such as Spanish tortilla, marinated olives, and cheese platters
  • A classic Greek salad with cucumbers, olives, red onions, and a tangy vinaigrette

Common Questions

What type of salt do you use?

I use Redmond Real Salt, please note that depending on the salt you use, your dish may be less or more salty. Salt is to taste so please always taste and adjust as you cook.

What can I use instead of rusks?

If you don’t want to use Rusks you are more than welcome to toast your own baguette slices on a grill pan just like you would for bruschetta and use that instead.

Can I make this ahead of time?

Just like Italian bruschetta, this recipe should be served right away as the bread will become soggy. To make it ahead, you can store the grated tomatoes in the fridge for a few hours so you have them ready to assemble when you want to serve the Greek Bruschetta.

How can I make the Rusks a bit softer?

Some people like adding a little bit of water on the rusks to soften them but I personally don’t like to as my tomato mixture does that for me regardless.

Greek Bruschetta

Greek Bruschetta

If you love Italian bruschetta, you will absolutely love this recipe as I feel like this is the Greek version of that, and equally as delicious. This is the best appetizer or light lunch in the world. My mom has been making me this recipe ever since I can remember and it’s my favourite Greek dish.
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Course: Appetizer, Side Dish
Cuisine: Greek, Mediterranean
Servings: 1
Author: The Modern Nonna
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients 

  • 2 rusks, or any double baked bread alternative
  • 2 tomatoes, grated
  • 1 pinch salt , to taste
  • dry oregano, to taste
  • 3 teaspoons olive oil
  • feta , or Greek mizithra cheese

Instructions 

  • Wash and dry the tomato. Cut a little bit off the end of the tomato and grate it on a hand held grater over a bowl. I like to grate mine on the biggest side as it’s easiest.
  • Grate the tomatoes and discard the tomato skin. Add salt, dry oregano, and olive oil to the tomatoes.
  • Give it a stir and scoop it on top of the rusks or any double baked bread alternative you like.
  • Crumble some feta on top, wait a few minutes for the rusk to soften from the tomatoes and enjoy.

Video

Nutrition

Calories: 128kcal, Carbohydrates: 5g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 12g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 9g, Sodium: 45mg, Potassium: 294mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 3g, Vitamin A: 1033IU, Vitamin C: 17mg, Calcium: 13mg, Iron: 0.4mg

Nutrition information is automatically calculated, so should only be used as an approximation.

Additional Info

Course: Appetizer, Side Dish
Cuisine: Greek, Mediterranean
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Hi! I'm Sneji. Nice to meet you!

I am more commonly known as “The Modern Nonna” on social media where I create easy home cooked meals with a modern twist. I was born and raised in Sofia, Bulgaria and learned how to cook at the best culinary school in the world – my grandma’s kitchen. I lived in Greece on the Island of Crete with my parents for a while and then moved to Toronto, Canada when I was in grade 5. I started to really cook and experiment with food 11 years ago when I was 21 years old. Everything I currently know is a reflection of some part of my life…

Keep up to date with me on social media! Follow @themodernnonna

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