Italian Bruschetta

5 from 1 vote

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Italian Bruschetta. The word bruschetta is pronounced “broos-ke-ta” and it comes from the word bruscare which means “to toast”. This is hands-down one of the most popular appetizers worldwide and the easiest recipe to make. Bruschetta originated in Italy during the 15th century. However, the dish can be traced back to Ancient Rome, when olive growers would bring their olives to a local olive press and taste a sample of their freshly pressed oil using a slice of bread. In Italy, bruschetta is often prepared using a brustolina grill but since I don’t have one, we use any grill pan we have on hand. This appetizer or antipasti is perfect when you’re hosting, and everyone will be really impressed.

Table of Contents

These are ideal in summertime, when its peak tomato season, and you have your pick of the bunch: cherry tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, sungolds, and more are all excellent varieties to consider.

Italian Bruschetta

This is hands-down one of the most popular appetizers worldwide and the easiest recipe to make. Bruschetta is ideal in summertime, when its peak tomato season, and you have your pick of the bunch: cherry tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, sungolds, and more are all excellent varieties to consider.
5 from 1 vote
Servings: 3
Author: The Modern Nonna
Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients 

  • 1 baguette, or any bread cut into 6 slices
  • olive oil
  • ½ clove garlic (for the bread)
  • 1 ½ cups cherry tomatoes, halved or 1 large heirloom tomato, cut into chunks
  • salt to taste
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 2 to 3 basil leaves, ripped or chopped
  • balsamic glaze or balsamic vinegar, for serving (optional)

Instructions 

  • Drizzle each bread slice with a little bit of olive oil on each side. Get a grill pan, oil it up a bit, and heat on medium-high heat. Once hot, grill the bread on each side until charred.
  • Remove the bread from the grill and rub each slice with the half clove garlic. This will give the bread so much aroma and flavour.
  • Add the tomatoes to a bowl with a pinch of salt, minced garlic, basil, and drizzle of olive oil and stir. Top each slice of bread with a heaping tablespoon of the tomatoes. Optionally, you can drizzle on balsamic glaze or balsamic vinegar and enjoy.
  • This appetizer is meant to be enjoyed right away so if you are making it for a party you can grill the bread the day before and toss everything together before you serve it. It is not to be kept in the fridge because it will go soggy.

Notes

You are more than welcome to cut, oil up, and bake the bread in the oven at 400F for 15-20 minutes.
Feel free to improvise and make this recipe your own by adding balsamic on top. I use 6 slices of a French baguette for this recipe but feel free to toast any bread you enjoy, such as ciabatta.
I made six pieces of bruschetta out of what I had on hand but feel free to double this recipe.
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Hi! I'm Sneji. Nice to meet you!

I am more commonly known as “The Modern Nonna” on social media where I create easy home cooked meals with a modern twist. I was born and raised in Sofia, Bulgaria and learned how to cook at the best culinary school in the world – my grandma’s kitchen. I lived in Greece on the Island of Crete with my parents for a while and then moved to Toronto, Canada when I was in grade 5. I started to really cook and experiment with food 11 years ago when I was 21 years old. Everything I currently know is a reflection of some part of my life…

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